And we’re back home, after 10 wonderful days in Japan.

This post is dedicated to the Japanese, who have been a constant surprise. We knew that Japanese are by definition well-educated, nice and well organized. But reality is even better: we felt welcomed in the best way possible, we felt respected and treated with kindness. And we felt safe every time, everywhere. That kind of safety that we don’t find at home. No one tries to deceive you, no one pushes you against the train doors to get in first, everyone waits patiently in line.

There’s a particular experience we want to share with you. Once we came back to Tokyo after 4 awesome days in Kyoto, we took a train to Akabane, searching for a Japanese pub described in a blog kept by an italian girl. The place didn’t accept credit cards, and we where short on cash. One place, though, had drawn our attention on the way to the pub, and we decide to try it. Its name was RaclettexRaclette,  and we fell immediately in love. First of all the place that night was run exclusively by women, and the plates looked soooooo good. There was half a wheel of Raclette cheese on the counter, everyone was eating with cutlery, there was a great selection of wines and there was an open kitchen. Although the kitchen was very small, the girls were perfectly synchronized, and the best thing is they seemed to have the best time ever. It was lovely to see them work and joke and laugh, and the plates coming out of the 4 sq. metres kitchen were aboslutely amazing.

For a moment we felt like being in Paris…but It was even better, because we were in an amazing city with amazing and kind and nice people.

RaclettexRaclette is just one of the many great experiences we had in Japan, and we feel so blessed to have met such an amazing culture.

So we want to say thanks to all of those who helped with this trip. Thank you girls of the Raclette, we had the best time ever; thank you Massimiliano&Rieko for all the precious advices; thanks to Orsola who shared our enthusiasm for this island; thank you Rico of the Yumiya – Komachi hotel for the amazing experience of living in an old Japanese house and for introducing me in Kyoto as Peppe-San; thanks to the Nepalese guy of the Mystays Hotel in Tokyo to whom we were the first italians he had ever met, and thank you everyone who made us feel like family.